Archives for category: For 12 and upwards

Image result for coyote summer thebo

Published by Oxford University Press

The story of a troubled, young, rich and indulged teenager uprooted from her secure and comfortable life in London and left in the wilds of Kansas on her aunt’s farm. This is a moving, brilliantly written superb tale of growing up, responsibilities and taking on the challenges of disappointment, whilst working towards something important. Life on a Kansas farm is far harder, both physically and mentally than she expects and she is driven to continue her love of dancing out in the wilds, in private, with just a coyote looking on. Dancers should definitely read this…

It is a wonderful book, something for the Summer holidays and one to disappear into – I think it is better than her first book, Dreaming the Bear which is always a very good sign – and something that really pleases me too, it has the right ending – buy it.

On searching the Internet for photographs of the cover, it seems there was a film also called Coyote Summer, released in 1996

This looks to be a better story – I haven’t seen the film though!

This is the film of the book.

Read the book, then go and see the film.

Both are emotional rollercoasters – both are extraordinary.

I feel that Patrick Ness & J A Bayona actually produced a film that honoured the book.

Strangely, the book also honours the film; but you do need to read it before you go and see it.

I cried when reading the book.

I cried, I think, almost throughout the film.

Not to be missed.

Read the book as soon as you can and try and get into the cinema with as few people in it as possible – I had five people at my showing at 17.50 in the early evening.

I don’t believe we disturbed one another.

A film that shows the power of anger and grief in such a way is a powerful vehicle.

Perhaps it was because this was a little close to me, that I found myself so involved, but, that said, I haven’t spoken to anyone else who hasn’t been affected by this film.

It is a pity that with all the sadness in the world that can’t be helped, that people continue to treat others in the way they do –

we should remember this…we are all people after all, and all feel and care, one way or another…

 

 

Published by Pushkin Press –

Once again a superb book published by Pushkin Press.

This is a book for all those cat lovers out there – those who know cats as felines / cats, not as ‘kitties’ or any other derogatory and disrespectful term… These cats mean business.

Set in India in the heart of old Delhi – it is atmospheric and superbly crafted. Three main types of cats live in the area – indoor cats, most of whom never go out, the Wildings a group of felines living with respect for each other, their prey and other species around them and another group the Ferals – enclosed in a shuttered house who’s Big Foot is coming to the end of its life…They are not respectful. They kill for pleasure and enjoy any torment that they can cause in the process.

This is not a cat book for those of a delicate nature. It is a beautifully observed extraordinary volume. There is life and death in this book – beautifully described and detailed…

As to characters – each is distinctive and as different as you might wish from a book that isn’t about cats – some cruel, some wise, and the kittens, almost mindlessly falling and tumbling though life and the dangers that are set against them.

It is marvellous.

There is a note in the back which states that the story continues in a volume called The One Hundred Names of Darkness. Which I will be ordering, of course, as soon as I return to work tomorrow. I hope and trust it will be as good. Looking on the computer – there is a note that states this title won’t be available till November. Irritating, but I expect I will survive.

My only complaint – and it is a severe one, is that Nilanjana Roy, lives in India, which I suppose is reasonable, considering the setting of this book. It does mean though that it is unlikely I will ever meet her and she probably won’t come and ‘do’ an event in Waterstones. Which is a great pity. I have been told though, that I can have a single title table for this – and will organise this as soon as the weekend is over.