Archives for the month of: September, 2016

Published by Simon and Schuster

A number of this charming book arrived in the store today. Published as a small octavo hard back with a wonderful dust jacket – it is very distinct.

There are not enough good quality books for this age group. It is often difficult to find books that are well written, with a good engaging plot and pictures that complement the book. This small book ticks all those boxes…

At least so far; I have only just started it, however I am confident that I am very unlikely to change my mind about it.

I picked up a copy and started to read it on the shop floor. Not something that is really approved of; we are there to sell books, not to read them. So most of my knowledge comes from those I either buy, or receive as proofs and read on the train and in bed, just before my cat gets too irritated and pushes the book out of the way, or knocks the pile by my bed to the floor.

I have so far read to the end of chapter 4 – and I’m thoroughly enjoying the story – I want to know all about Shylo and Horatio’s history too – I’m curious to find out why Horatio is in such a tatty condition.

I have recently set up a small table for books for this age group that shouldn’t be missed. It will be put there when I get into work tomorrow.

It starts with the definition of different types of rabbit… Please see the entry for the play Toad of Toad Hall, the play for which I have written a post, which references different types of rabbit – so this pleased me from the beginning.  The Rabbit Kingdom, it seems, is made up of six different types:

Buck – A male rabbit.

Bunkin – A country rabbit.

Bunny – A young rabbit.

Doe – A female rabbit.

Hopter – A large, strong and clever rabbit

and lastly – perhaps the best,

Thumper – A Special Forces commando rabbit.

It starts with our hero Shylo, a young bunny visiting Horatio, a rabbit with a bit of history. He lives on his own on the outskirts of the warren near the farm and Shylo is not supposed to go anywhere near the farm and certainly never to speak to Horatio…

He has visited Horatio at least once before to listen to his stories about The Royal Rabbits of London and Horatio’s adventures. I’m afraid Shylo hasn’t been very honest with his mother; making up stories about where he goes when he is supposed to be out foraging.

I have just reached the part when Maximilian his eldest brother catches up with him…

Its superb – beautifully written, and illustrated by Kate Hindley with gorgeous black and white pictures which are full of character.

If I can I’d like to have an event for the book – but that is something I will have to look into tomorrow. The book though should be purchased by everyone – at just £11 (less 1 penny) it won’t break the bank and further will encourage those younger readers with parents of a wise, discerning and sensible disposition to try something new.

Buy it. Waterstones Finchley Road O2 have some signed copies. At least they did this evening. We may run out in the next few days.

 

 

Published by Canongate.

This is the new book (the second) in the Christmas Series by Matt Haig and is due out at the very beginning of November. The first book, A Boy Called Christmas came out last year as a hardback, and will be out this year as a paperback, and both books should be bought as a pair for the season and read allowed to all good little children, and any bad, who haven’t been found out yet.

This is a Christmas story (hence the red type face, I thought it would look seasonal), and is full of hope and the belief in Christmas. Amelia has only one thing she wants for Christmas, but there is a very good chance that Christmas, might not happen at all and she has found herself in a workhouse – at Christmas.

It is full of possibly impossible things (though that rather depends on your point of view), and a others which are decidedly not impossible. There is a cat, with a rather determined and brilliant character, a mouse, the Northern Lights, a troll, (actually several of these) a jealous and rather lonely newspaper editor, truth-telling pixies, and story-telling pixies too…and of course there is Father Christmas…

The books should be bought together, and read as bed time stories in the lead up to the end of the winter term – a superb couple of books for everyone to enjoy…both illustrated by Chris Mould. Read and enjoy!

 

Published by Canongate

This was published as a lovely small hardback edition last Christmas, and will be published this as a paperback. The book is illustrated by Chris Mould and the combination of a good Christmas tale and his illustrations makes this, and the follow on book, The Girl Who Saved Christmas a brilliant pair of volumes for Christmas. I hope that Waterstones will make the set of books the Book of the Month for November – they are ideal to be used as a book at bed-time for the winter term…in preparation for Christmas.

Nikolas’ mother has died before the story begins. His father is a poor forester, and Nikolas has only ever been given two presents in the whole of his life: a turnip doll, his mother gave him, and a small sleigh from his father. He is happy enough, however and has a small brown mouse for company. When Nikolas’ father is offered a job, that will take him far into the North, his aunt comes to look after him and his life is turned upside down.

Which is where the story really begins…a true Northern adventure for Christmas. Full of elves, pixies, (including a truth pixie), trolls, reindeer, a kidnap (yes, a kidnap), bravery, sacrifice, hunting, magic…and things that aren’t impossible…a word no child should ever use… 

Buy this in good time for Christmas, and save it – to be read to all good little children (and some perhaps some not so good), up to Christmas…make it a tradition.

 

Published by Bloomsbury

With a back drop of the Russian landscape this is an extremely atmospheric tale of adventure. Feodora and Ilya, heroine and hero along with a small pack of  wolves are racing against time. There are rumbles of a revolution, whispers of people taking back control and ending the suffering that has pervaded the land for so long.

This is a wonderful adventure full of the smells of winter and wolves. Feodora’s life has been sheltered; she has had little to do with people, her life has been spent helping her mother ‘repatriate’ wolves no longer wanted by the rich of Russia’s elite. A repatriation  that is dangerous as wolves are intrinsically  not reliable, and people can’t be trusted, in certain circumstances either.

This is a book full of the stuff that fairy tales are made of. It certainly has the feel of folk lore and is a brilliant adventure. It will be one of those books to be read around a fire, with the snow falling in flurries outside a dark window…