Archives for category: Lisa Thompson

Image result for the boy who fooled the world

Scholastic Children’s Books

This is a story of a lie. Not just a small, little lie, but one of those, spur of the moment, ‘no-one will realise’ lies, that expand and grow expeditiously – till they become all encompassing, all pervading.

Cole it seems, can paint. That’s what everyone is told and everyone believes. His first painting by any stretch of the imagination was a success. The only snag to this tale of joy is that everyone expects another…and he doesn’t know what it is that made the first so successful. What it was that made it ‘the picture’ – what made his ‘talent’ stand out to the artist who visited his school…

This is a story of repercussions. Of pressures. Of trying to do the right thing. Of new trainers…It’s also a tale of a mystery – a painting with a secret never solved…and a story of a sister…

 

Published by Scholastic (January 2018)

This is a story about families. Sometimes parents get things wrong. Sometimes they bring new people into the family who shouldn’t be there. This is a story of a young boy being brought up by his mother who decides that the man she hoped would become a loving husband and father, isn’t what he should be.

Her solution is to leave and to stay in a house that her new partner doesn’t know about. It is rather dilapidated, however, Nate realises that for the first time in ages,  his mother is happy. She’s singing again. Then when she doesn’t return from a brief shopping trip, Nate is surprised when an old friend materialises…

This is a touching story dealing with a serious subject in a very careful way. It certainly wouldn’t be for everyone. There is no direct physical violence, but it does cover psychological and the feeling of tenseness in the air.

The above illustration is from Garden Lovers Club – Mason Jar Light (with thanks, its just right for this) – as a light jar is a pivotal point in the story.

Published by Simon and Schuster January 2017

Mathew Corbin is an only child and  he spends the majority of his time in his bedroom, watching people go past in the street. He writes everything down along with the times people go out, when they return, and how often they water their pot plants.

Life is not easy for Mathew. He believes that he is responsible for a tragedy in his past and this colours everything he does, and doesn’t do. Life is prescriptive, threatening and painful. He suffers from a form of obsessive compulsive disorder.When a neighbour’s small grandson goes missing Mathew decides that he has to do something, even if it can’t be very much, since going outside isn’t really on the cards.

There are obvious correlations between this and Mark Haddon’s book The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time, though this is much more suited for younger readers.

Ultimately this is a positive book, dealing with a severe mental disorder and that worst nightmare of a missing child…