Archives for category: Walker Books

Image result for white rabbit red wolf

Published by Walker Books.

Things are not what they seem in this complex and intricate, roller-coaster of a  thriller.  Relationships that are ‘normal’ are found to be anything but. Pete’s mother does what she can, particularly since his Dad isn’t around any more.  Pete’s twin, his sister, elder by 8 minutes, has always been there for him too – supporting him when life becomes too difficult, because Pete suffers from panic attacks. These too aren’t just debilitating, they are so much more – all encompassing episodes of lack of control.

To try to keep things on the level, Pete counts. Everything. He knows things, facts are clear, unchangeable. Numbers are good – they don’t change either and can prove things that would otherwise be threatening, erratic, and dangerous.

This is a knot of a thriller – a mixture of mathematics and numbers, paradoxes, murder, fires, consequences, relationships – and being a 16 year old male…

I’d read about libido spiking in the wake of a big adrenalin hit, but I’d never experienced it before. It’s really weird: your brain chemistry shouting contradictory instructions at you like a war movie drill sergeant.

“Private Blankman! ATTENTION! Run! Hide! Run again! Good! Now you’re no long in immediate physical danger, father as many offspring as possible in the next sixty seconds, in case the threat comes back! AT THE DOUBLE, YOU MISERABLE MAGGOT!”

It’s an ‘edge of the seat’ sort of book…

 

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Image result for clownfish

Published by Walker Books

This book is about grief, and fish. In particular a specific clownfish. They are the Nemos of the fish world. Dak’s father has recently died from a heart attack. His mother is trying to do her best, however, she is really too ill with grief to support her son very much and he finds himself drawn to the local aquarium. He and his father had spent many hours just watching the fish, and its there he feels closest to him.

It is a small aquarium, run by a friend of Dak’s father and he runs it with help from a young man, Johnny, who gives the talks to the public. It is when Dak is gazing into one of the coral fish tanks that he hears his name being called from behind him, and things begin to change.

Dak visits everyday and is relieved to be asked by the owner whether he would be happy help with the fish; it gives him a very good excuse for his visits. His first public appearance results in his being soaked by some rather exuberant sea bass, but also gives him some quiet satisfaction, and he begins to enjoy working around the fish, in particular the tanks with the clownfish.

This is a touching, simply written rather wonderful book about grief, and the sometimes strange roads that grief can take you down.

Sadly the book hasn’t been given its final cover, it is due out in November and I read one of their proofs – so I have raided the Internet once more for a suitable picture for this and since pipefish are also mentioned in the book, I thought this one would be most suitable.

The picture is credited to Pxleyes; I hope they don’t mind my using it – much the best I thought.

 

 

Published by Walker Books

I wonder, do you know a Wild Child? For that matter, are you secretly, a Wild Child? I have a feeling that anyone can be one, at any age…

This is a wild book, for wild children, those who cast off sensible shoes and are just a little wild.

Lets make sure that there are always wild children, out in the wilds…doing wild things…they can always come in and be sensible, a little later…perhaps.

A book, a rather marvellous book, to encourage a little wildness – for those who are wild at heart… Without wildness what would the world be like?

Published by Walker Books

This is a rather lovely unique adventure story. A fantasy novel which is a little different. The characters are intricate and well developed. It has a reflection of Charles Dickens, but is also something totally different. No 13 has no memory of anything outside the orphanage where he has grown up. Part fox, part boy he is naive and struggles to survive in an orphanage run by evil Miss Carbunkle. Things don’t look good, and they don’t look likely to change either, until another groundling persuades him that together they can escape…

It has elements of steampunk, has brilliant language and clever ideas – this is something special and like nothing else I have read. Animals that are people at the same time are well mixed into the story – each with their own abilities and idiosyncrasies. Some are more animal than others. Some are more child.  There is even an aye-aye like boy, who is similar to the character of the Artful Dodger in Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens.  Which I suppose has meant I am even more pro this story than I might have been, having become a little infatuated with all things Madagascan…

This is a tale of bravery, mechanical beetles, adventure, and character – frankly something that will take you away from the everyday…into another world.

My proof is a fat hardback – an inch and a half or so thick, and some 450 pages. Illustrations will be prolific, and if the chapter heading devices are anything to go by, should be suitably atmospheric…Mira Bartok is both the author and illustrator.

Published by Walker Books.

This post was started as a review of Truth or Dare. Then I remembered Trouble, also by Non Pratt and expected to find an earlier post about that brilliant volume. For some reason, that I don’t know, it never got on to the site. So it has a mention at the end – as these are both books to sink into…

I have never ‘played’ Truth or Dare. Not even when the Internet didn’t exist. I sometimes wonder at the repercussions for those who now become involved in these challenges, particularly now that they can be viewed by everyone who has access to social media. I suppose I didn’t like the idea of where such encounters might lead. Would I have spoken the truth, would I have done something dangerous, just to be part of a group? I don’t know – I avoided the issue.

This is book is about two brothers, a dare that went right, and dares that perhaps didn’t end in the way the participants expected. It is a tale with a heart. It covers the phenomenon of social media dares – Internet sites that, to quote one, states: ‘…a social media where users upload video proof to earn street-cred.’ Which isn’t something I have ever worried about. In this book the dares, are on the whole, performed for another result entirely. Well, most of the time…

The book comes in two parts. Claire’s and then Sef’s story; you read hers and then (with my proof) turn the book over to read Sef’s. Claire’s starts in September. Sef’s in August; the story ends in the following February.

It is the story of bravery – and not just as a result of the dares. Friendship and of course trust. It is also about facing the truth, however hard. It is also about how small things can change lives irrevocably. It is also the story that begins, in a way with a small bat.

A bat. Flying mammal. As in blind as a…

This is an enticing book – one that will get under your skin. It is a rollercoaster of a ride with death just a page turn away…

Do you dare to read it?

Non Pratt also wrote Trouble which came out some time ago – a book about teenage pregnancy which was enticing, and extraordinary. Sadly I either hadn’t set up my blog then, or I just didn’t get around to reviewing it, which would be strange, as I became totally involved with the book.

So, buy the two as a pair – they make good siblings and are brilliant reads.

I have removed the pictures from this post – as they have reverted to the Walker Books logo – not much help when searching for them. I have replaced it with this rather nice Edward Gorey illustration. I think its rather fun…