Archives for posts with tag: Scholastic Children’s Books

Image result for morgan charmey teen witch birchall scholastic

Published by Scholastic

Morgan has never been to school. She has been taught at home by her Mum’s best friend. The one thing she really wants though, is to go, however, she won’t be doing that (or learning to fly) until she has passed her Young Witch Exam…which so far she has spectacularly failed to do.

At the start of this story everything changes and she at last manages to pass her exam. She will be going to school, to make new friends, to be a ‘normal’ teenager. Though one with an extremely annoying familiar (yes, witches do have familiars) and the ability to practice magic. Though obviously she won’t be doing that…

Things though, don’t quite go to plan…

I loved this – funny and thoroughly enjoyable. I particularly loved her shape shifting familiar Merlin…

Lovely stuff.

 

Image result for the unexpected find ibbotson

Published by Scholastic.

A mystery. A storm and an extremely cold, not to say freezing Swedish winter. This is the story of a skein of three friendships twisted together and compelled to travel in the hope of finding the answers to their questions. It is a story of friendship, trust and bravery.

It is something we may all enjoy reading as the temperature rises in June – it is a long time since I read something that was so compelling and describes the sense of touch, in this case cold, so fundamentally.

Enjoy it. Something different for the Summer.

No idea if this really will be the cover…due out in June 2019

 

 

Published by Scholastic

May 2018

A re-imagining of The Little Mermaid.

I received a copy of The Little Mermaid in 1971 – for a prize for attendance at my first school. Not really sure about such a prize. I think my mother should have received it. The fact that I never missed a day was surely down to her. It was an Emerald Book, published by World Distributions and retold by Mae Broadley and illustrated by Jo Berriman – sadly I can’t find a picture on the Internet of it. So it must be rare and obviously, all the more valuable, because I won it at school…

That aside, I have just gone downstairs and found it. Yes, I still have it – its in ‘good’ condition. Well, what would you expect from a girl brought up by an antiquarian bibliophile? I suppose I should really say, the daughter of a bibliophile who collects antiquarian books. Dad may be in his 80’s, but he’s not antiquarian, yet. It is a hardback picture book version with illustrations which are slightly dated, (none the worse for that) and pale; the book wasn’t printed on art paper. So it was a subtly produced volume, the colours were muted. Rather lovely.

I vaguely remembered the story when I received my proof of The Surface Breaks, but not in any great detail. This edition, is without doubt a teen / YA book – written just as Hans Christian Anderson wrote his tales. Without doubt this is a new rendition he would have approved of.

It is a story of coming of age. The patriarchal oppression of women. Of bravery, love and ultimately, sacrifice. This is not a ‘Disney’ version of this tale – it is a strong punchy and determined shout. Dark and twisted.

The cover on the proof has some rather lovely mermaid scales – whether that will translate through to the finished book is in the lap of the ‘Book Gods’.

 

 

Published by Scholastic (January 2018)

This is a story about families. Sometimes parents get things wrong. Sometimes they bring new people into the family who shouldn’t be there. This is a story of a young boy being brought up by his mother who decides that the man she hoped would become a loving husband and father, isn’t what he should be.

Her solution is to leave and to stay in a house that her new partner doesn’t know about. It is rather dilapidated, however, Nate realises that for the first time in ages,  his mother is happy. She’s singing again. Then when she doesn’t return from a brief shopping trip, Nate is surprised when an old friend materialises…

This is a touching story dealing with a serious subject in a very careful way. It certainly wouldn’t be for everyone. There is no direct physical violence, but it does cover psychological and the feeling of tenseness in the air.

The above illustration is from Garden Lovers Club – Mason Jar Light (with thanks, its just right for this) – as a light jar is a pivotal point in the story.

I have been asked to review my last post about this small volume by a customer who has direct experience of the subject; her son, born a daughter. He expressed his belief from a very early age and so, I have made a note that it should be within the 9 – 12 age group.

The use of the correct pronoun for suffers is important – and within this story, though initially confusing for those of us who haven’t come across sexual dysphoria directly, is right and proper – and not just a device.

This is an important volume – it is not a subject that is covered in fiction for children, it is a unique children’s book in my experience. As such may be of help to those who are affected by this.

Having looked on the NHS site dealing with sexual dysphoria, they suggest that anyone who has, or has a child who may be showing signs that they have it, that they should contact their GP who may well refer them on to a specialist Gender Identity Clinic.

 

 

Published by Scholastic

Due out in March 2017

This is Sylvia Bishop’s second book. I enjoyed her first, Erica’s Elephant when it came out, and  wrote a post about it. I have been selling it to all discerning young readers ever since. This, though, I loved. The Jones family, Netty, Michael and Property own the White Stag – a bookshop sited in an old pub.

They are happy enough, though financially things are not quite what they should be.

This is the story of what happens when all that changes, it seems for the better.

Property is our heroine, but she is certainly supported by other the other brilliant characters, including my favourite Gunther, a cat who has decided opinions about things and expresses himself very clearly – very much in the way my Pakka does.

It is a book about book forgeries. Its about dishonesty and it is about integrity too. I read this yesterday – and was amused by this element of the story. In the last year or so a real forgery has been discovered. A fake copy of a book by Galileo – about the moon and astronomy – Sidereus Nuncius (the English translation from the Latin, ‘Sidereal Messenger’). Dad and I saw the original book whilst we were in Italy in September  – so I enjoyed the connection with this – and the fact that it is a very small mistake the forgers made in both this fictional forgery and the real one, that meant they were found out.

The Montgomery Book Emporium is like no other shop I have ever heard of  – and I am certain I would enjoy working there – should one exist. It is a vast series of shops within one – each opening into a central ‘Front of Shop’ area. I think I would enjoy selling to the customers there, perhaps more than those at Watersones – if only because I would enjoy just moving around the shelves…Perhaps though, if I moved, ‘my’ customers would follow me to The MBE – then it would be even more special…

This is a book for book lovers, book SHOP loves and of course, cat lovers everywhere.

It is wonderful!

I couldn’t find a picture of the cover – so have cheated a bit – the above picture I thought was a suitable one – gleaned from the Internet…I thought he/she was rather beautiful. All bookshops should have their own cat…

crush-eve-ainsworth

Published by Scholastic Children’s Books

Not yet Published at time of going to Press: March 2016

This is a spiral of ever increasing tension until the last page.  What is love? How do you know whether it is healthy or not? A book about people, fear and control, a little bit of music and love… Another book where I worried about the characters – another ‘good’ book, with emotion and energy…