Archives for posts with tag: Pushkin Children’s Books

Published by Pushkin Books – September 2017

Translated from Swedish by Peter Graves

My proof was/is an oversized paperback, 8 x 6, and about 2 inches thick. Some 589 pages, including the last which is an illustration.

This is the story of Sally Jones, a ship’s engineer who’s captain is wrongly accused and convicted of murder.  It tells the tale of her adventures trying to find a way to prove his innocence. There are many circumstances and people out to prevent her from succeeding – and it is a wonderful tangle of adventure, travel, three humped camels, accordions, music, sailing, friendship, bravery and the odd fight too! I’m afraid I haven’t finished this yet, reaching only page 260 – mainly because I have been reading Sally’s adventures before I go to sleep, and not carrying  it around with me.

Sally Jones is talented, clever and observant, and also happens to be an ape, which means that though she can’t talk, she can certainly communicate, and is literate too. Being an ape amongst humans, however, adds to her problems. She won’t be able to help her captain from the inside of a zoo…

The illustrations at the head of each chapter are superb – full of wonderful detail – beautifully illustrating each chapter – so each is unique, these are not devices, but pictures to be studied and enjoyed as much as the story.

This is, I’m afraid another success for Pushkin. I seem to be a bit of a fan of this publishing house – but there you go – good books deserve good reviews, and Pushkin keep producing good books, and it is obvious they must have good authors to write them. The publisher’s info. states that it should be published on the 7th of September – in a jacketed hardback (just as it should be) – the illustrations alone are worth the extra cost. Buy this for anyone special you know, who like a good book – I am sure you know someone and it would be a delight to receive as a Christmas Prezzie – or ‘seasonal gift’ – whatever you like to call the holidays around December…

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Published by Pushkin Children’s Books

Translated from the Polish by Eliza Marciniak

I am sorry to report that the picture that I put up transformed itself into another – which had nothing to do with Det. Nosegoode – so I have removed the picture that relates to this – it had a red cover and was similar in style to the others in the series. See below…

Very odd…

This is another Pushkin title that shouldn’t be missed. This story of a retired policeman and his dog investigating a theft of a rather special music box. It is charming and beautifully illustrated by Jerzy Flisak.

Detective Nosegoode spends his days playing the flute, and growing radishes. (I’d love to know why he grows radishes. A most peculiar vegetable to grow, I always find them to be too bitter.) He reads the paper to his dog, with whom he discusses the news.  Cody is a rather unique dog.  When the music box disappears Cody has his own views about what has happened and the strange man in the village, with the fake moustache and the poison bottle.

I wanted to illustrate this with a picture of Blackbeard, however, I can’t find a source on the internet. Trust me – it is a wonderful picture. As is the one of the poison bottle.

A book about bravery. Theft. Doing what is right. Poison, treasure and temptation.

As always with Pushkin the design of the book is up to their usual high standard. Lovely paper with nice red, thick card covers. These have the French fold and are as a consequence a little more sturdy, and look more professional. It is set in c. 12 point, I think – though this might be wrong. It is beautifully set in what my Dad refers to as black! Beautifully clear and ‘set’. Though I suppose that phrase is a little redundant now-a-days. The illustrations are bold and give the impression of lino cuts – though this might be inaccurate. This is a super little book.

It is one of three titles. The others in the series are:

Detective Nosegoode and the Kidnappers & Detective Nosegoode and the Museum Robbery.

Published by Pushkin Press –

Once again a superb book published by Pushkin Press.

This is a book for all those cat lovers out there – those who know cats as felines / cats, not as ‘kitties’ or any other derogatory and disrespectful term… These cats mean business.

Set in India in the heart of old Delhi – it is atmospheric and superbly crafted. Three main types of cats live in the area – indoor cats, most of whom never go out, the Wildings a group of felines living with respect for each other, their prey and other species around them and another group the Ferals – enclosed in a shuttered house who’s Big Foot is coming to the end of its life…They are not respectful. They kill for pleasure and enjoy any torment that they can cause in the process.

This is not a cat book for those of a delicate nature. It is a beautifully observed extraordinary volume. There is life and death in this book – beautifully described and detailed…

As to characters – each is distinctive and as different as you might wish from a book that isn’t about cats – some cruel, some wise, and the kittens, almost mindlessly falling and tumbling though life and the dangers that are set against them.

It is marvellous.

There is a note in the back which states that the story continues in a volume called The One Hundred Names of Darkness. Which I will be ordering, of course, as soon as I return to work tomorrow. I hope and trust it will be as good. Looking on the computer – there is a note that states this title won’t be available till November. Irritating, but I expect I will survive.

My only complaint – and it is a severe one, is that Nilanjana Roy, lives in India, which I suppose is reasonable, considering the setting of this book. It does mean though that it is unlikely I will ever meet her and she probably won’t come and ‘do’ an event in Waterstones. Which is a great pity. I have been told though, that I can have a single title table for this – and will organise this as soon as the weekend is over.

 

9781782690832

Published by Pushkin Children’s Books

I loved this. Comparatively there is very little good writing for this age group. Books that are well written with good plots, with or without illustrations for this genre seem to be lacking in quantity on our shelves. This though was superb – I loved it. Another foreign author (Lene Kaaberbol is Danish) being published in English by Pushkin Children’s Books (They also published Meet at the Ark at Eight / Hubb) – and again it is a brilliant tale.

Clara is badly scratched by a cat, and as a result suffers from cat-fever…and thus starts Clara’s new life as a Wildwitch, in a world that is both magical and dangerous…

This is a mystical, wonderful story about a reserved and quiet child caught up in something so much larger than she…

There are two other books in the series, but they don’t seem to be available over here yet. Pushkin really need to make sure that the later books are published quickly – once you read this one you will want to read the other two.

It is marvellous.

 

Published by Pushkin Children’s Books

This slim charming volume of just 62 pages is a wonderfully illustrated story of Noah’s ark – with a difference. Three penguins are arguing in the snow and ice. After all there is not much to do in a landscape just made up of snow and ice.

Thus starts one of the most amusing and thought-provoking books that I have read in a very, very long time. Liberally illustrated by Jorg Muhle, and translated from the German.

As the flap in the front so beautifully describes:

Meet the Ark at Eight! is  a delight: the funny, odd and strangely moral story of three penguins, a plump, overworked dove, a beautiful butterfly that may, or may not get done in, and a quite apologetic God.


To me and being slightly sacrilegious – this is how the bible should be…at least this is the tale of the ark as it should be told.

I never thought about the dove in that way, but will do so for ever more.

It really is a book that should be tucked into all parcels for Christmas      (it does have snow, ice and penguins) – or at least shared by everyone as they sit around a fire…

It took me just an hour to read one of our copies at work. We had three. We now have only one in stock.